Hong Kong's Top 10... Spooky Stories

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1. Bride Pool Left before the altar
Nestled within Plover Cove Country Park rests an idyllic waterfall trickling into a shallow pool of rocks. This is the Bride’s Pool. People say it got its name when a bride was being carried by sedan chair to a nearby village where her husband-to-be was waiting, when one of the porters slipped, sending her into the rapids. Her body was never found. Today, some people report seeing a woman dressed in a red cheongsam brushing her hair near the majestic waters.

2. Nam Koo Terrace WW2 fall out
This Wan Chai historic building is one of HK’s best known haunted houses. Japanese soldiers used it as a brothel and a place of torture, and it is said that women’s spirits still roam headless at night. As the story goes, in 2003, after spending the night, a group of youngsters had to receive psychiatric treatment.

3. The Braid Girl Train accident returnee
Near Chinese University, numerous male students have reported seeing a girl with a single braid walking alone at night. The wickedly creepy part is that, after approaching her, she turns to reveal an identical single braid where her face should be. The girl is said to come from the Mainland and crossed the border illegally with her boyfriend but failed to hop the train to Kowloon, falling face first into the iron railroad tracks. 


4. Tuen Muen Road A deadly corner
Accidents on this road are frequent and severe. In 2003, a double decker bus plunged into Ting Kau Village leaving 21 passengers dead and 20 injured, and there were four documented cases of similardouble decker crashes found prior. It’s hardly a surprise, then, that ghosts are said to appear suddenly in the middle of the roadregularly.


5. Sai Ying Pun Community Centre All in the mind
Built in 1892, the building that now houses a community centre was once a mental hospital and execution hall during the Japanese Occupation. There remain rumours of women crying, mysterious footsteps, men bursting into flames and decapitated ghosts on the site.

6. Garley Building Sight of a gruesome fire
The gruesome fire in 1996 which ravaged the Jordan building forced people to jump from windows or burn alive. Ever since, nearby construction workers have heard voices and physically been dragged around or messed with. Despite several attempts to renovate the building, reconstruction efforts remain unfinished.

7. Mang Gui Kiu The mysterious bridge
Near this bridge in Tai Po, ashen-faced children have been seen waving to passing cars at night and mini-bus drivers have said some of their passengers have vanished once they alighted the bus. Many believe that they may be the ghosts of the children who drowned in a flood here in 1955, for whom there’s a monument erected nearby.
 

8. The Mitsukoshi Department Store Department Store hauntings
During its existence between 1981 and 2006, the Japanese store saw various reports from security guards of mysterious children’s voices at night. Staff would also occasionally find toys moved around the children’s department. It was later discovered that the store was built on an old burial ground where many executed people were laid to rest. Today, it’s where Hysan Place stands…

9. MTR suicide A ghost on the tracks
In the early 80s, a young woman fell onto the tracks at Yau Ma Tei station just as the train was arriving. People reported hearing blood-curdling screams and the train driver recalled a harrowing bump. But as medical personnel arrived, they found no one – not even a drop of blood. The investigation failed to find any leads and the incident was written off as a ‘collective hallucination’.

10. Wan Chai Tung Shing Cinema The haunted theatre
In its 1960s heyday, this cinema was often seemingly packed out. But, creepily, this may not have been the truth. Many reported seeing a full house in the dark, but later, when the lights came up, there were few – or, indeed, no – other people in the theatre. Women using the restroom also reported seeing a faceless ghost in the mirror. It was, surprise(!), a former funeral parlour. Ying Lo

 

 

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